Legislative Theater for Racial Justice Action Planning

This collaboration brings together nine pioneering Theater of the Pooressed scholars and artists from Brazil to UCLA for a two-week residency. While here, the artists will support students in creating new proposed legislation through theater. This proposal seeks to engage these practitioners as trainers and advisors so that the student/campus community created proposals have the best chance at becoming policies and laws. Legislative theater is a methodology in which popular theater is used to create, refine, and propose new legislation and policy.

Feature Extraction: Algorithmic Culture under Algorithmic Capitalism

This collaboration is a series of two public, weekend programs that bring together artists and academics who engage machine learning algorithms in their work. This interdisciplinary collaboration will explore the social, political, and generative dimensions of machine learning through recent arts and scholarship. We envision the weekend as a way to connect UCLA's arts and technology community and the larger Los Angeles public with an accessible and exciting primer on machine learning and how algorithms are changing finance, media, and society.

Forensic Architecture and Radical Practices in a Post-Truth World

The arena of human rights documentation has never been more explosive, thanks in great part to a new evidentiary movement inspired by the development of human rights technology applications and geospatial satellite imagery. Geospatial technologies represent a range of tools used in the collection, presentation, analysis, and management of location-based data.

Encountering the Unseen: artist-actualized lectures on topics in STEM fields

Encountering the Unseen is an academic symposium as work of experimental live theater. Our project is to pair artists, choreographers, performers, and musicians from both UCLA and the greater Los Angeles area with professors working in STEM fields at UCLA. The project consists of three workshops, leading up to a fourth and final performance event - an evening symposium of five brief but stimulatin lectures on topics as wide ranging as ecology and evolution, mechanical engineering, astrophysics, and more.

Wadada Leo Smith

Trumpeter, multi-instrumentalist, composer, and improviser Wadada Leo Smith is one of the most boldly original and influential artists of his time. Transcending the bounds of genre or idiom, he distinctly defines his music, tirelessly inventive in both sound and approach, as "Creative Music."

For the last five decades, Smith has been a member of the legendary AACM collective, pivotal in its wide-open perspectives on music and art in general. He has carried those all-embracing concepts into his own work, expanding upon them in myriad ways.

Alexis Gambis, Filmmaker and Visiting Professor of Biology, Film, and New Media, NYU Abu Dhabi

Inaugural seminar, student discussions, and film screening of Alexis Gambis' film "The Fly Room," as the first in a series of interdisciplinary seminars around "Science in the Media." Alexis Gambis will participate in discussions of his film and his career, as well as the process of scientific research, the role of science in society, and the role of media in portraying science accurately to the public.

Smart and Sustainable Cities

This awards funds a proposal to bring speakers to campus to cover the question of "what makes a sustainable city?," covering the key areas of energy, water, transportation, the built environment (including affordable housing and shared public spaces), and the digital city & sharing economy (social and economic transformations engendered by digital communications).

Disability as Spectacle

The award provides funding to host Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and Karen Nakamura as part of UCLA Disability Studies' conference on Disability as Spectacle. This interdisciplinary conference aims to stimulate a discussion around how society constructs, reacts, and embraces or rejects visible and invisible disabilities in the public sphere. As visibility continues to increase in popular culture, scholars will need to confront a changing landscape in which (some) disabilities are de-stigmatized while others are prevented from participating in the new visibility.