Whitmania! Songs of Ourselves: Celebrating the Radical Optimism of Walt Whitman and UCLA

2019 marks both UCLA's centennial and the bicentennial of Walt Whitman. This collaboration seeks to explore the relation ship between these two milestones through Whitmania! a constellation of cultural events examinig the legacy of a poet who is a foundational figure in American culture. Often described as the first American bard of democracy and the father of free verse, Whitman is one of the world's most influential poets, and the hallmarks of his work are those of UCLA itself: radical optimism and community engagement for the greater good.

Refugee Worlds, Refugee Lives: In and Out of Africa

This collaboration emphasizes the critical needt o rethink the contemporary refugee crisis in Africa and beyond by approaching it as a social and historical formation with the potential to solve the very problems it represents. Building bridges between infrastructure, sustainability, political representation and narrative, this collaborative seminar and workshop series and keynote lecture will explore the generative potentials of refugees as camps develop into communities.

Forensic Architecture and Radical Practices in a Post-Truth World

The arena of human rights documentation has never been more explosive, thanks in great part to a new evidentiary movement inspired by the development of human rights technology applications and geospatial satellite imagery. Geospatial technologies represent a range of tools used in the collection, presentation, analysis, and management of location-based data.

The Monochord: Ancient Music Theory and A New Method of Chromatic Scale Construction

The purpose of this workshop is to introduce new findings on two important music theories from ancient China and Greece. It focuses on the monochord as a scientific apparatus that aided the development of theories attributed to Guanzi in the seventh century BCE and Pythagoras in the sixth century BCE. These techniques were both musically intuitive and mathematically sound for creating chromatic scales.

Wadada Leo Smith

Trumpeter, multi-instrumentalist, composer, and improviser Wadada Leo Smith is one of the most boldly original and influential artists of his time. Transcending the bounds of genre or idiom, he distinctly defines his music, tirelessly inventive in both sound and approach, as "Creative Music."

For the last five decades, Smith has been a member of the legendary AACM collective, pivotal in its wide-open perspectives on music and art in general. He has carried those all-embracing concepts into his own work, expanding upon them in myriad ways.

Michael Hulme

Michael Hulme is Professor of Geography at Cambridge. He was previously Professor of Climate and Culture at King's College London, and was the founding director of the Tyndall Center for Climate Change resaerch. He led the preparation of UK climate scenarios. Hulme was part of the group that received the Nobel citation in 2007 for work on climate change in the IPCC. He is also a founding editor of Wiley interdisciplinary Reviews Climate Change. He is the author of numerous books, incluidng the seminal "Why we disagree about climate change," and more recently "Weathered,"

Frances Collins, Director, National Institute of Health

Proposal to bring Frances Collins, Director of the NIH, to UCLA to discuss the intersections of faith and science, in particular how his work on the genome project is in concert with his personal religious beliefs. In addition, the proposal plans for Dr. Collins to speak with faculty regarding pedagogy related to issues of religion and science, as well as, hopefully, to discuss the development of interdisciplinary courses.

Alexis Gambis, Filmmaker and Visiting Professor of Biology, Film, and New Media, NYU Abu Dhabi

Inaugural seminar, student discussions, and film screening of Alexis Gambis' film "The Fly Room," as the first in a series of interdisciplinary seminars around "Science in the Media." Alexis Gambis will participate in discussions of his film and his career, as well as the process of scientific research, the role of science in society, and the role of media in portraying science accurately to the public.

Disability as Spectacle

The award provides funding to host Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and Karen Nakamura as part of UCLA Disability Studies' conference on Disability as Spectacle. This interdisciplinary conference aims to stimulate a discussion around how society constructs, reacts, and embraces or rejects visible and invisible disabilities in the public sphere. As visibility continues to increase in popular culture, scholars will need to confront a changing landscape in which (some) disabilities are de-stigmatized while others are prevented from participating in the new visibility.