Legislative Theater for Racial Justice Action Planning

This collaboration brings together nine pioneering Theater of the Pooressed scholars and artists from Brazil to UCLA for a two-week residency. While here, the artists will support students in creating new proposed legislation through theater. This proposal seeks to engage these practitioners as trainers and advisors so that the student/campus community created proposals have the best chance at becoming policies and laws. Legislative theater is a methodology in which popular theater is used to create, refine, and propose new legislation and policy.

Michael Hulme

Michael Hulme is Professor of Geography at Cambridge. He was previously Professor of Climate and Culture at King's College London, and was the founding director of the Tyndall Center for Climate Change resaerch. He led the preparation of UK climate scenarios. Hulme was part of the group that received the Nobel citation in 2007 for work on climate change in the IPCC. He is also a founding editor of Wiley interdisciplinary Reviews Climate Change. He is the author of numerous books, incluidng the seminal "Why we disagree about climate change," and more recently "Weathered,"

Professor Relebohile Moletsane, Dube Chair in Rural Education, University of Kwazulu-Natal

Proposal to bring Professor Relebohile Moletsane, Dube Chair in Rural Education at the University of Kwazulu-Natal in South Africa, to UCLA to lead and participate in a number of discussions to explore commonalities between disadvantaged communities in the Los Angeles area, the U.S., South Africa, and other countries of the global south. The sponsors also propose to develop a collaborative research agenda focusing on health promotion, human rights, policy, and girls' education.

Smart and Sustainable Cities

This awards funds a proposal to bring speakers to campus to cover the question of "what makes a sustainable city?," covering the key areas of energy, water, transportation, the built environment (including affordable housing and shared public spaces), and the digital city & sharing economy (social and economic transformations engendered by digital communications).

Disability as Spectacle

The award provides funding to host Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and Karen Nakamura as part of UCLA Disability Studies' conference on Disability as Spectacle. This interdisciplinary conference aims to stimulate a discussion around how society constructs, reacts, and embraces or rejects visible and invisible disabilities in the public sphere. As visibility continues to increase in popular culture, scholars will need to confront a changing landscape in which (some) disabilities are de-stigmatized while others are prevented from participating in the new visibility. 

Transdisciplinary Homelessness Research: Measure H and Beyond

This one week residency by visiting speaker Prof. Dennis Culhane of the University of Pennsylvania is designed to galvanize transdisciplinary research and training in response to the homelessness crisis. In Los Angeles County, more than $1 billion in annual expenditures fund strategies to combat the homelessness and housing crisis. This is a critical moment for the UCLA research community to support policymakers with rigorous research to inform and evaluate these massive investments, including Measures H and HHH, while fulfilling our commitment to the public good.

UCLA Blum Center Spring Symposium

Support for the Second Annual UCLA Blum Center Spring Symposium, which aims to: seek and facilitate collaborations among university schools, departments, centers and other entities by inviting their experts to offer multi-disciplinary perspectives in creating responses to improve health services and outcomes among Latin American populations, and; deliver the scientific program to the target audience representing faculty, researchers, students, health care professionals and community members working to improve health among Latin American populations.

Embodiment in Unequal Environments

A four-part seminar series featuring scholars working at the intersections of inequality, bodies and embodiment, environment, and race. The purpose of the series is to draw students and faculty from across the UCLA community and the public into a timely discussion around race, biomedicine, governance, and diverse ideas about the body as an object of intervention and care.

Race and Capitalism: Global Aspects

unding for a series of activities around the theme of "Race and Capitalism: Global Aspects," involving faculty from the departments of African-American Studies, Anthropology, Chicana/o Studies, History, Urban Planning, and two research centers - the Institute on Inequality and Democracy at UCLA Luskin and the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment.