Michael Hulme

Michael Hulme is Professor of Geography at Cambridge. He was previously Professor of Climate and Culture at King's College London, and was the founding director of the Tyndall Center for Climate Change resaerch. He led the preparation of UK climate scenarios. Hulme was part of the group that received the Nobel citation in 2007 for work on climate change in the IPCC. He is also a founding editor of Wiley interdisciplinary Reviews Climate Change. He is the author of numerous books, incluidng the seminal "Why we disagree about climate change," and more recently "Weathered,"

Smart and Sustainable Cities

This awards funds a proposal to bring speakers to campus to cover the question of "what makes a sustainable city?," covering the key areas of energy, water, transportation, the built environment (including affordable housing and shared public spaces), and the digital city & sharing economy (social and economic transformations engendered by digital communications).

Politics, Ethics and Well Being in the Anthropocene

This series of events, to be held in Winter 2018, brings to UCLA two leading scholars who connect ethics, governance, changes to nature, and human systems. Jedediah Purdy teaches constitutional, environmental, and property law at Duke University . Dale Jamieson is Department Chair and Founding Director of Environmental Studies and Animal Studies, as well as Professor of Philosophy , Law, and Bioethics at New York University and is author of Love in the Anthropocene.

Drowning World

This award contributes funding towards UCLA Art & Global Health Center;s new collaboration with the UCLA Center for Climate Change Solutions, the UCLA Geography Muir Chair and Studio, the Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, and the Visual and Performing Arts Education Minor to bring the award-winning photographer Gideon Mendel to campus to show and discuss his "Drowning World" project. Mendel, who hails from South Africa and now lives in London, takes photographs of people whose homes have been flooded.

Bioeconomy and Deep Decarbonization: Lessons for the Future from a Decade of Biofuel Policies

A one-day workshop convening a group of experts to consider three topics: the broad question of the optimal use of land to meet deep decarbonization targets; the focused question of aviation and heavy-duty transportation sector, where many analysts foresee especially pressing need for low carbon liquid fuels; and to reflect on lessons learned from the last decade of experience with indirect land use change in biofuel policies—such as the competition between using lands used for carbon sequestration for production of food, fiber, and biofuels.