Whitmania! Songs of Ourselves: Celebrating the Radical Optimism of Walt Whitman and UCLA

2019 marks both UCLA's centennial and the bicentennial of Walt Whitman. This collaboration seeks to explore the relation ship between these two milestones through Whitmania! a constellation of cultural events examinig the legacy of a poet who is a foundational figure in American culture. Often described as the first American bard of democracy and the father of free verse, Whitman is one of the world's most influential poets, and the hallmarks of his work are those of UCLA itself: radical optimism and community engagement for the greater good.

Forensic Architecture and Radical Practices in a Post-Truth World

The arena of human rights documentation has never been more explosive, thanks in great part to a new evidentiary movement inspired by the development of human rights technology applications and geospatial satellite imagery. Geospatial technologies represent a range of tools used in the collection, presentation, analysis, and management of location-based data.

Michael Hulme

Michael Hulme is Professor of Geography at Cambridge. He was previously Professor of Climate and Culture at King's College London, and was the founding director of the Tyndall Center for Climate Change resaerch. He led the preparation of UK climate scenarios. Hulme was part of the group that received the Nobel citation in 2007 for work on climate change in the IPCC. He is also a founding editor of Wiley interdisciplinary Reviews Climate Change. He is the author of numerous books, incluidng the seminal "Why we disagree about climate change," and more recently "Weathered,"

Alexis Gambis, Filmmaker and Visiting Professor of Biology, Film, and New Media, NYU Abu Dhabi

Inaugural seminar, student discussions, and film screening of Alexis Gambis' film "The Fly Room," as the first in a series of interdisciplinary seminars around "Science in the Media." Alexis Gambis will participate in discussions of his film and his career, as well as the process of scientific research, the role of science in society, and the role of media in portraying science accurately to the public.

Disability as Spectacle

The award provides funding to host Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and Karen Nakamura as part of UCLA Disability Studies' conference on Disability as Spectacle. This interdisciplinary conference aims to stimulate a discussion around how society constructs, reacts, and embraces or rejects visible and invisible disabilities in the public sphere. As visibility continues to increase in popular culture, scholars will need to confront a changing landscape in which (some) disabilities are de-stigmatized while others are prevented from participating in the new visibility. 

Chemical Entanglements: Gender and Exposure

This award provides funding for a symposium, lecture, and workshop, which will convene a group of researchers, scientists and community-based researchers, artists, documentarians, and policy makers to assess the gendered impacts of (primarily endocrine-disrupting) chemicals on human populations. By marshaling a variety of perspectives—laboratory, ethnographic, epidemiological, and narrative, this transdisciplinary collaboration will seek to explore how gender has made a difference in the public’s knowledge with regard to the cumulative effects of environmental toxins.

Women's Health and Gender Differences Cross-Campus Symposium Series

A new symposium series to engage cross-campus collaboration at UCLA in the area of women's health scholarship and research, in particular connecting the College and the Health Sciences to solve complex problems involving women's health and wellness. This series includes both trainees and faculty and is the result of a previous strategic planning conference to promote "North and South" collaboration to improve women's health. Faculty of all disciplines can present their work-in-progress.