Encountering the Unseen: artist-actualized lectures on topics in STEM fields

Encountering the Unseen is an academic symposium as work of experimental live theater. Our project is to pair artists, choreographers, performers, and musicians from both UCLA and the greater Los Angeles area with professors working in STEM fields at UCLA. The project consists of three workshops, leading up to a fourth and final performance event - an evening symposium of five brief but stimulatin lectures on topics as wide ranging as ecology and evolution, mechanical engineering, astrophysics, and more.

Michael Hulme

Michael Hulme is Professor of Geography at Cambridge. He was previously Professor of Climate and Culture at King's College London, and was the founding director of the Tyndall Center for Climate Change resaerch. He led the preparation of UK climate scenarios. Hulme was part of the group that received the Nobel citation in 2007 for work on climate change in the IPCC. He is also a founding editor of Wiley interdisciplinary Reviews Climate Change. He is the author of numerous books, incluidng the seminal "Why we disagree about climate change," and more recently "Weathered,"

Drowning World

This award contributes funding towards UCLA Art & Global Health Center;s new collaboration with the UCLA Center for Climate Change Solutions, the UCLA Geography Muir Chair and Studio, the Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, and the Visual and Performing Arts Education Minor to bring the award-winning photographer Gideon Mendel to campus to show and discuss his "Drowning World" project. Mendel, who hails from South Africa and now lives in London, takes photographs of people whose homes have been flooded.

Chemical Entanglements: Gender and Exposure

This award provides funding for a symposium, lecture, and workshop, which will convene a group of researchers, scientists and community-based researchers, artists, documentarians, and policy makers to assess the gendered impacts of (primarily endocrine-disrupting) chemicals on human populations. By marshaling a variety of perspectives—laboratory, ethnographic, epidemiological, and narrative, this transdisciplinary collaboration will seek to explore how gender has made a difference in the public’s knowledge with regard to the cumulative effects of environmental toxins.