Refugee Worlds, Refugee Lives: In and Out of Africa

This collaboration emphasizes the critical needt o rethink the contemporary refugee crisis in Africa and beyond by approaching it as a social and historical formation with the potential to solve the very problems it represents. Building bridges between infrastructure, sustainability, political representation and narrative, this collaborative seminar and workshop series and keynote lecture will explore the generative potentials of refugees as camps develop into communities.

Forensic Architecture and Radical Practices in a Post-Truth World

The arena of human rights documentation has never been more explosive, thanks in great part to a new evidentiary movement inspired by the development of human rights technology applications and geospatial satellite imagery. Geospatial technologies represent a range of tools used in the collection, presentation, analysis, and management of location-based data.

Wadada Leo Smith

Trumpeter, multi-instrumentalist, composer, and improviser Wadada Leo Smith is one of the most boldly original and influential artists of his time. Transcending the bounds of genre or idiom, he distinctly defines his music, tirelessly inventive in both sound and approach, as "Creative Music."

For the last five decades, Smith has been a member of the legendary AACM collective, pivotal in its wide-open perspectives on music and art in general. He has carried those all-embracing concepts into his own work, expanding upon them in myriad ways.

Michael Hulme

Michael Hulme is Professor of Geography at Cambridge. He was previously Professor of Climate and Culture at King's College London, and was the founding director of the Tyndall Center for Climate Change resaerch. He led the preparation of UK climate scenarios. Hulme was part of the group that received the Nobel citation in 2007 for work on climate change in the IPCC. He is also a founding editor of Wiley interdisciplinary Reviews Climate Change. He is the author of numerous books, incluidng the seminal "Why we disagree about climate change," and more recently "Weathered,"

Embodiment in Unequal Environments

A four-part seminar series featuring scholars working at the intersections of inequality, bodies and embodiment, environment, and race. The purpose of the series is to draw students and faculty from across the UCLA community and the public into a timely discussion around race, biomedicine, governance, and diverse ideas about the body as an object of intervention and care.

Understanding the New Middle East

This award contributes funding towards a symposium on Understanding the New Middle East, organized by the Center for Near Eastern Studies and faculty from the Departments of History, Sociology and Anthropology. This conference will bring together academics, commentators, and other experts to explore the roots and nature of the current crises in the Middle East and to plot the region’s future trajectory. 

Race and Capitalism: Global Aspects

unding for a series of activities around the theme of "Race and Capitalism: Global Aspects," involving faculty from the departments of African-American Studies, Anthropology, Chicana/o Studies, History, Urban Planning, and two research centers - the Institute on Inequality and Democracy at UCLA Luskin and the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment.

Women's Health and Gender Differences Cross-Campus Symposium Series

A new symposium series to engage cross-campus collaboration at UCLA in the area of women's health scholarship and research, in particular connecting the College and the Health Sciences to solve complex problems involving women's health and wellness. This series includes both trainees and faculty and is the result of a previous strategic planning conference to promote "North and South" collaboration to improve women's health. Faculty of all disciplines can present their work-in-progress.